There are three routes to choose from - the Bronze Route, the Silver Route and the Gold Route. The Bronze Route is a short walk around historic Dundee (15 min walk), The Silver Route is a walk around Dudhope Park (30 min walk) and the Gold Route is a walk up the Law and back (60 mins walk).  Walk times are based on an average walking speed of 20 mins per mile.

These routes are suitable for people of all abilities.

 

The cliff trail north of Arbroath is awash with fascinating rock formations, christened with such evocative at the Deil's Heid, Seaman's Grave and Mermaid's Kirk. It's a bracing coastal walk skirting the swirling sea that can be enjoyed at any time of the year.

The Angus Coastal Route from Dundee to Aberdeen takes you along 58 miles of beautiful coastline, nature reserves and country parks.  The route begins in Dundee, with its fascinating industrial heritage and maritime traditions and takes you north to Aberdeen; a stunning city of glittering granite.

Along this route you will discover a spectacular coastline with picturesque seaside resorts - Broughty Ferry, Monifieth, Carnoustie, Arbroath, Montrose, Inverbervie, and Stonehaven.

Leisurely Walk: walks for reasonably fit people with a little country walking experience. May include unsurfaced rural paths. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are recommended.

Start on City Road opposite Saggar Street.  Walk down City Road until you reach Scott Street.  Turn right onto Scott Street and then take the next left onto Glenagnes Road.  Turn right onto Logie Avenue and walk to the end of the street.  In front of your a path winds up to a viewpointt.  Take this path up to Balgay Road.  Cross over Balgay Road and turn right.  Take the path opposite and on your left into the park.  Follow this up to where several paths intersect and take the right hand path.  Follow this path keeping left, follow this round to the observatory.

After looking at the observatory, turn to your left towards the bollards.  Walk back down the road and turn to your left.  Take the eighth path on your right just after another set of bollards and follow it back down the hill.  At the bottom, turn right and walk back to another entrance to Balgay Park (beside Lochee Park).  Turn right and follow the path round the other side of the viewpoint.

When you reach the junction of paths (where you originally turned off for the observatory) turn left and continue on the trodden earth path back down to Saggar Street.  Walk back along Saggar Street to City Road.

Distance:  2 miles
Time:  1 hour
Grade:  2

Start on city Road opposite Saggar Street.  Walk down City Road until you reach Scott Street.  turn right onto Scott Street and then take the next left onto glenagnes Road.  Turn right onto Logie Avenue and walk to the end of the street.  In front of your a path winds up to a viewpoint.  Take this path up to Balgay Road.  Cross over Balgay Road and turn right.  Take the path on the left into the park.  Walk up to the second path on your right.  Take this path up the hill.  After the steps going down to your right, you will see a second set of steps going up to the right, beside a lamppost.  Take these steps and you will have an excellent view out across Dundee.  Continue on the trodden earth path back down to Saggar Street.  Walk back along Saggar Street to City Road.

Distance:  1.1 miles
Time:  25 minutes
Grade:  2

Balgay Hill, home of the city's Mills Observatory, has a fine mixture of deciduous and large conifer trees. For a relaxing afternoon, walk along the network of footpaths offering magnificent views across the River Tay.

Victoria Park offers a mixture of rose gardens, bedding plant displays, active play and recreational areas.

Lochee Park, donated to the city by the Cox Brothers (jute mill owners) in 1890, provides ample space for active sports.

A disabled access guide is available for this park which can be viewed on the AccessAble website.

Leisurely Walk: walks for reasonably fit people with a little country walking experience. May include unsurfaced rural paths. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are recommended.

Scotland was pushed into the Earth under a mass of ice, in some places more than one mile thick.  Seas inundated previously dry land and formed new beaches as the ice melted, allowing the land to rise again and the River Tay and the North Sea to assume their current positions. This left the new sandy beaches high and dry.

Broughty Ferry Local Nature Reserve is a good example of a raised beach. Here the sand-dunes lie on top of bedrock composed of Andesitic Lava, which had been pushed up from underground. Look out for lumps of lava as you walk through the reserve.

From Tentsmuir car park, follow the pinecone waymarkers along the forest track leading west, signposted to Morton Lochs. You will reach the edge of the forest, at Junction 7. Continue to follow the pinecone waymarkers until you reach Morton Lochs, where you can follow the lochside Feather Walks or watch for wildlife from one of the four hides located around the water.

Relax by the River Tay on this delightful walk along peaceful waterside paths lined with mature leafy deciduous trees and carpets of wildflowers. The route starts in the charming Perthshire village of Dunkeld where whitewashed houses with crow-step gables and neatly clipped lawns crowd the magnificent ruins of the historic cathedral at the heart of the friendly wee community. It's a popular spot for tourists, but you will quickly escape the crowds as you venture out along the riverside, sharing the calm tranquillity with the salmon fishermen. The return leg of the route passes below the crags of King's Seat where you may be lucky enough to see a Golden Eagle.