There are three routes to choose from - the Bronze Route, the Silver Route and the Gold Route. The Bronze Route is a short walk around historic Dundee (15 min walk), The Silver Route is a walk around Dudhope Park (30 min walk) and the Gold Route is a walk up the Law and back (60 mins walk).  Walk times are based on an average walking speed of 20 mins per mile.

These routes are suitable for people of all abilities.

 

The Airlie monument is a familiar landmark in the lower reaches of Glen Clova and Glen Prosen, sited on Tulloch Hill between the two. It is well worth a visit for the fine views as well as to see the monument itself - a memorial to the ninth Earl of Airlie who died in the Boer war.

More history is recorded at a monument at the bottom of the hill to polar explorers Robert Falcon Scott and Edward Adrian Wilson, who planned their ill-fated trip to the South Pole in 1912 in the area.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

From the junction of Beauly Crescent and Ambleside Avenue, walk along Beauly Crescent until you reach Forres Avenue on your right.  Walk down Forres Avenue until you get to the big roundabout on Gilburn Road. From here turn right and walk along Gilburn Road until you reach Ambleside Terrace.  Walk up and along Ambleside Avenue where you will return to the junction with Beauly Crescent.

Distance: ¾ mile
Approximate Time: 15 mins

The cliff trail north of Arbroath is awash with fascinating rock formations, christened with such evocative at the Deil's Heid, Seaman's Grave and Mermaid's Kirk. It's a bracing coastal walk skirting the swirling sea that can be enjoyed at any time of the year.

The Angus Coastal Route from Dundee to Aberdeen takes you along 58 miles of beautiful coastline, nature reserves and country parks.  The route begins in Dundee, with its fascinating industrial heritage and maritime traditions and takes you north to Aberdeen; a stunning city of glittering granite.

Along this route you will discover a spectacular coastline with picturesque seaside resorts - Broughty Ferry, Monifieth, Carnoustie, Arbroath, Montrose, Inverbervie, and Stonehaven.

Leisurely Walk: walks for reasonably fit people with a little country walking experience. May include unsurfaced rural paths. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are recommended.

Seaton Cliffs has spectacular red sandstone cliffs with numerous sea caves, stacks, blowholes, arches and rock formations. The cliffs support a mosaic of habitats, including coastal grassland, sand dunes and woodland.

It's a bracing coastal walk skirting the swirling sea that can be enjoyed at any time of the year.

There are three routes to choose from:  the Bronze Route is a short walk around the old harbour area, the Silver Route is a walk past the remains of Arbroath Abbey and the Gold Route is a walk by the sea through two parks.

Start on the corner of Balunie Avenue and Balbeggie Place.  Turn onto Balbeggie Place and then turn right onto Balerno Street.  Walk along Balerno Street and then turn left into Banchory Road.  When you reach the end of Banchory Road turn right into Aboyne Avenue.  Walk along and take the next road on your left.  Continue along Huntly Road until you reach a path going off your left.  Follow this path to the Arbroath Road.  Turn left and walk along the Arbroath Road, passing Monymusk Playing field and Claypotts Park.  Turn left onto Baldovie Road and then left again onto Balunie Avenue.  Walk back to the starting point.

Distance:  2.5 miles
Time:  50 minutes
Grade:  2

Start at any point on Dalmahoy Drive.  Walk down Dalmahoy Drive and at the end turn right.  You will see a path leading into the woods.  Walk along this path through the woods, with the Coupar Angus Road on your left.  You will reach a path that turns off to your right, there will also be an opening to cross the Coupar Angus Road on your left.  Take the path to the right and follow it straight up through Templeton Woods.  Keep following this track until you reach the end.  Turn to your right and follow the path past the water tower.  At the end of this path turn left and head up towards Clatto County Park, part of Dundee's water supply network.  When you reach the road, turn right and walk along until you get back to Dalmahoy Road.  Walk back down Dalmahoy Drive to the place you started from.

Distance:  2.7 miles
Time:  50 minutes
Grade:  3

Start on Rosemount Road and walk towards Downfield Golf Course.  Walk along Rosemount Road, following it as it changes to Dalmahoy Drive.  When you reach Birkdale Place turn right and continue along this road until you reach the end.  Turn right onto Macalpine Road and follow it down unitl you reach the junction with Rosemount Road. Turn right onto Rosemount Road and walk back to where you started.

Distance: 2.2 miles
Time: 40 mins
Grade: 2

Start outside Ardler Complex and turn to your left.  Walk along Turnberry Avenue until you reach Glenagnes Lane, there will be a small pond to your right.  Walk to the end of this road and turn left on to Glenagnes Road.  At the end of Glenagnes Road turn right onto Glenagnes Avenue.  Follow this road all the way round to Turnberry Avenue. You will see a large pond on your right.  Turn left and walk back to Ardler Complex along Turnberry Avenue.

Distance:  1.2 miles
Time:  20 minutes
Grade: 1

From the junction of Gilburn Road and Derwent Avenue, keeping Asda to your left, walk along Gilburn Road until you get to the footpath on your left that runs up between the petrol station and house number 37.  Follow this path to the start of Coniston Terrace and cross over on to Kendal Avenue.  Walk up Kendal Avenue past the grassy areas to your left and right, until you reach Keswick Terrace.  Turn left along Keswick Terrace then turn left past the bus stop and on to Derwent Avenue.  Carry on down Derwent Avenue until again you reach the junction with Gilburn Road.

Distance:  ½ mile
Time:  Approximately 10 minutes

There are three routes to choose from: the Bronze Route is a walk around Auchtermuchty, the Silver Route is a walk with views to the Lomond Hills and the Gold Route is a walk through Pitmedden Forest and back through Auchtermuchty Common.

Seeking out the beating heart of a waterfall lost in an ancient forest of Scots Pine trees is one of the true pleasures of venturing into the countryside.

Combine this with a walk through a remote glen where craggy hillsides loom ominously overhead and you have a real walk on the wild side.

A mixed woodland containing Scots Pine, Oak, Sycamore and Silver Birch, Backmuir Wood, between Muirhead and Liff, is home to Red Squirrels, Roe Deer and Jays. It is a popular spot with local walkers and is within easy reach of Dundee.

This is an All Ability Trail that is managed by the Woodland Trust. The trail is accessed by the entrance on Liff Road. It meanders through a woodland that is rich with mature trees and is popular with local dogwalkers. The trail has wide paths but there are cross gradients up to a maximum of 10.9% (1:9) throughout the trail with much of the path having a camber of approximately 50cm wide. There are only two seating areas at the start of the trail at the entrance.

Backwater reservoir nestles in the eastern Angus hills 14 miles NW of Forfar, at an altitude of 300 m. Opened in 1969, it is nearly 4 km long (N-S) and about 0.5 km wide. It serves the main towns in Angus as well as Coupar Angus and Blairgowrie, and provides additional supplies to Dundee should the demand on nearby Lintrathen Reservoir become too great. The dam is 500 m long and the reservoir contains some 25 million cubic metres of water. Fishing for wild brown trout is from the bank only.

A minor road continues north from the B954 at Dykend across the dam and up the east side to Glenhead farm. At the West end of the dam is a large car park with toilets. There is another car park and picnic area, with summer only toilets, on the east side. 

Leisurely Walk: walks for reasonably fit people with a little country walking experience. May include unsurfaced rural paths. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are recommended.

Everyone has them - those rather non-descript Sundays when, despite the best intentions the night before when the rucksack's packed and the sandwiches are made, an uncertain grey sky outside tempts you to spend rather too long lazing about in bed and, in the process, the notion of an early start is firmly knocked on the head. Badandun Hill in Angus is perfect fodder for just such an occasion.

Perched between Glen Isla and forested Glen Finlet, an approach from Kirkton of Glenisla in the south is perhaps the most rewarding, taking in the tranquil fishing spot of Loch Shandra on the way out while the day's goal remains in view throughout.

A short circuit around Balbirnie Park. This is one of the smaller, more accessible routes, which follows a woodland path by the river and back past the golf club and hotel. The path is wide enough for two people to walk side by side. There are a couple of slopes at gradient 15% (1 in 6). The surface of the path is firm but may be a little uneven in places. There are several seats close to the path, check out the map markers to find where they are.

A level path goes around the edge of Clatto reservoir and smaller paths extend into Baldragon Woods and Clatto Moor (which has been planted with trees). Admiral Duncan wood has had trees planted to connect Clatto plantations to Templeton Woods to give wildlife such as red squirrels more habitat.

The water is home to many ducks and diving birds, with many fish living in the very deep water. Facilities at Clatto include a watersports centre, children's play areas, picnic and barbecue site.  The park offers recreational activities, such as watersports, that can be organised through Ancrum Outdoor Centre.

Easy Walk: walks for anyone who does not have a mobility difficulty, a specific health problem or is seriously unfit. Comfortable shoes or trainers can be worn.

Balgavies Loch has long been recognised by naturalists as an important site for wildlife. This inland loch is surrounded by reedbeds and willow carr, attracting water rail, great crested grebe and a number of wintering wildfowl, including goldeneye, teal and widgeon. The reserve is a haven for red squirrel.

Join the loop at the entrance to Balgay Park, off Glamis Road. An off road path starts next to the Yew bushes at the gateway.  The path follows the wall at the edge of Lochee Park. At the top, cross the road, passed the bollards to continue climbing. Turn right and keep to the right to go behind the observatory, following the track around the top of the hill. Turn right again at the gate to descend, keeping to the right at the bottom. Take the right turn at the old bandstand, going under the bridge to the starting point. Take a detour to the top of the Planet Trail for a great view. Balgay is easy to access from the Greenways cycle routes.

Start on City Road opposite Saggar Street.  Walk down City Road until you reach Scott Street.  Turn right onto Scott Street and then take the next left onto Glenagnes Road.  Turn right onto Logie Avenue and walk to the end of the street.  In front of your a path winds up to a viewpointt.  Take this path up to Balgay Road.  Cross over Balgay Road and turn right.  Take the path opposite and on your left into the park.  Follow this up to where several paths intersect and take the right hand path.  Follow this path keeping left, follow this round to the observatory.

After looking at the observatory, turn to your left towards the bollards.  Walk back down the road and turn to your left.  Take the eighth path on your right just after another set of bollards and follow it back down the hill.  At the bottom, turn right and walk back to another entrance to Balgay Park (beside Lochee Park).  Turn right and follow the path round the other side of the viewpoint.

When you reach the junction of paths (where you originally turned off for the observatory) turn left and continue on the trodden earth path back down to Saggar Street.  Walk back along Saggar Street to City Road.

Distance:  2 miles
Time:  1 hour
Grade:  2

Start on city Road opposite Saggar Street.  Walk down City Road until you reach Scott Street.  turn right onto Scott Street and then take the next left onto glenagnes Road.  Turn right onto Logie Avenue and walk to the end of the street.  In front of your a path winds up to a viewpoint.  Take this path up to Balgay Road.  Cross over Balgay Road and turn right.  Take the path on the left into the park.  Walk up to the second path on your right.  Take this path up the hill.  After the steps going down to your right, you will see a second set of steps going up to the right, beside a lamppost.  Take these steps and you will have an excellent view out across Dundee.  Continue on the trodden earth path back down to Saggar Street.  Walk back along Saggar Street to City Road.

Distance:  1.1 miles
Time:  25 minutes
Grade:  2

Balgay Hill, home of the city's Mills Observatory, has a fine mixture of deciduous and large conifer trees. For a relaxing afternoon, walk along the network of footpaths offering magnificent views across the River Tay.

Victoria Park offers a mixture of rose gardens, bedding plant displays, active play and recreational areas.

Lochee Park, donated to the city by the Cox Brothers (jute mill owners) in 1890, provides ample space for active sports.

A disabled access guide is available for this park which can be viewed on the Disabledgo website.

Leisurely Walk: walks for reasonably fit people with a little country walking experience. May include unsurfaced rural paths. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are recommended.