Seeking out the beating heart of a waterfall lost in an ancient forest of Scots Pine trees is one of the true pleasures of venturing into the countryside.

Combine this with a walk through a remote glen where craggy hillsides loom ominously overhead and you have a real walk on the wild side.

The valley in which the Birks lies was shaped during the ice age, with the river Tay running through its centre. It contains one of the tributaries of the Tay – the Moness Burn – and the site has been a scenic walk for more than two centuries.

The Birks owes its popularity, at least in part, to Robert Burns, who is said to have found inspiration whilst resting in a small, naturally formed seat in the rock at the side of the gorge.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

Varied walk starting from the town centre, passing through woodland to view Black Spout waterfall and Edradour Distillery. From the higher section of the walk good views over the River Tummel and surrounding hills can be seen.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

In late autumn, Buchanty Spout is filled with wild salmon as they fight there way up stream through the raging torrents. Please be advised that there is no formal path or viewing area, so please take care particularly when it is wet underfoot.

 

 

Corrie Fee is truly dramatic, a massive bowl scooped out by a glacier, it is a National Nature Reserve. A very good path climbs gently to a viewpoint, with the option of extending the route to climb up the back of the corrie to a waterfall.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

Follow the defined track up to a small man-made cavern and viewing platform with rugged views north to Drummond Hill above Kenmore and the majestic Ben Lawers range. In summer, the surrounding woodlands are alive with flocks of siskins and other bird and wildlife.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

This walk takes you through a lovely wooded gorge to the Falls of Bruar in Perthshire. There is a good sized car park at the House of Bruar which is located just to the south of the falls. You soon pick up the footpath taking you along Bruar Water and through pine woodland to the falls. Along the way you will find several deep black pools, stone bridges, viewpoints and picnic spots. It's a fairly steep climb but worth the effort as the falls are clear and beautiful. There are two main falls plus a series of smaller ones to enjoy. The falls were immortalised in an 18th century poem by Robert Burns named the 'The Humble Petition of Bruar Water to the Noble Duke of Atholl'. Since then they have been a popular tourist attraction.

The beautiful Falls of Dochart run through the small town of Killin, in Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park.  Located at the western end of Loch Tay, the famous white waters of the Falls of Dochart can be viewed from the village’s bridge.

Easy Walk: walks for anyone who does not have a mobility difficulty, a specific health problem or is seriously unfit. Comfortable shoes or trainers can be worn.

Glen Esk is the longest and most easterly of the Angus Glens and, like the others, is sparsely populated. To reach the Glen take the 15 mile road, just north of Edzell that climbs alongside the River North Esk. A great reward for those who make the trip along the scenic winding road is is the excellent Glenesk Folk Museum where visitors can explore handicrafts and artifacts from bygone times.

The Hermitage (Ossian's Hall) is situated in 33 acres of conifer and deciduous woodlands. One of Britain's tallest Douglas fir trees is located here as is the amazing folly which overlooks the Black Linn waterfall. Two parallel paths lead from the car park; the one on the right is the more accessible, whereas the one on the left is closer to the river. This is a short trail with a gradual uphill. The left hand path is slightly uneven in places so visitors with limited mobility may require assistance.

Once part of one of the most important 18th century picturesque landscapes in Scotland, an attractive woodland walk leads though spectacularly large Douglas firs (including one of the tallest trees in the country) to the amazing folly, Ossian’s Hall overlooking the Black Linn waterfall.

 

 

The Maspie Den paths were laid out as a showplace of the Falkland Estate in the nineteenth century. Restored today they provide an excellent walk with some fascinating features.

The Reekie Linn is the most impressive waterfall in the region, its great power making it an awesome sight especially in spate. The very short walk to it is very pleasant through deciduous woodland on the rim of a deep and dangerous gorge.

Rumbling Bridge gorge is a dramatic box canyon in seemingly otherwise gentle countryside. This short figure-of-eight walk gives exciting glimpses of its rock walls and waterfalls.

It was here, after the Battle of Killiekrankie in 1689, that Donald MacBean a soldier in the defeated government army, escaped his Jacobite pursuers by leaping across this 5.5m (18.5ft) rocky chasm. There is network of paths down to the river from the nearby visitor centre.