The Airlie monument is a familiar landmark in the lower reaches of Glen Clova and Glen Prosen, sited on Tulloch Hill between the two. It is well worth a visit for the fine views as well as to see the monument itself - a memorial to the ninth Earl of Airlie who died in the Boer war.

More history is recorded at a monument at the bottom of the hill to polar explorers Robert Falcon Scott and Edward Adrian Wilson, who planned their ill-fated trip to the South Pole in 1912 in the area.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

The Angus Coastal Route from Dundee to Aberdeen takes you along 58 miles of beautiful coastline, nature reserves and country parks.  The route begins in Dundee, with its fascinating industrial heritage and maritime traditions and takes you north to Aberdeen; a stunning city of glittering granite.

Along this route you will discover a spectacular coastline with picturesque seaside resorts - Broughty Ferry, Monifieth, Carnoustie, Arbroath, Montrose, Inverbervie, and Stonehaven.

Leisurely Walk: walks for reasonably fit people with a little country walking experience. May include unsurfaced rural paths. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are recommended.

Seaton Cliffs has spectacular red sandstone cliffs with numerous sea caves, stacks, blowholes, arches and rock formations. The cliffs support a mosaic of habitats, including coastal grassland, sand dunes and woodland.

It's a bracing coastal walk skirting the swirling sea that can be enjoyed at any time of the year.

There are three routes to choose from:  the Bronze Route is a short walk around the old harbour area, the Silver Route is a walk past the remains of Arbroath Abbey and the Gold Route is a walk by the sea through two parks.

Start at any point on Dalmahoy Drive.  Walk down Dalmahoy Drive and at the end turn right.  You will see a path leading into the woods.  Walk along this path through the woods, with the Coupar Angus Road on your left.  You will reach a path that turns off to your right, there will also be an opening to cross the Coupar Angus Road on your left.  Take the path to the right and follow it straight up through Templeton Woods.  Keep following this track until you reach the end.  Turn to your right and follow the path past the water tower.  At the end of this path turn left and head up towards Clatto County Park, part of Dundee's water supply network.  When you reach the road, turn right and walk along until you get back to Dalmahoy Road.  Walk back down Dalmahoy Drive to the place you started from.

Distance:  2.7 miles
Time:  50 minutes
Grade:  3

A mixed woodland containing Scots Pine, Oak, Sycamore and Silver Birch, Backmuir Wood, between Muirhead and Liff, is home to Red Squirrels, Roe Deer and Jays. It is a popular spot with local walkers and is within easy reach of Dundee.

This is an All Ability Trail that is managed by the Woodland Trust. The trail is accessed by the entrance on Liff Road. It meanders through a woodland that is rich with mature trees and is popular with local dogwalkers. The trail has wide paths but there are cross gradients up to a maximum of 10.9% (1:9) throughout the trail with much of the path having a camber of approximately 50cm wide. There are only two seating areas at the start of the trail at the entrance.

Backwater reservoir nestles in the eastern Angus hills 14 miles NW of Forfar, at an altitude of 300 m. Opened in 1969, it is nearly 4 km long (N-S) and about 0.5 km wide. It serves the main towns in Angus as well as Coupar Angus and Blairgowrie, and provides additional supplies to Dundee should the demand on nearby Lintrathen Reservoir become too great. The dam is 500 m long and the reservoir contains some 25 million cubic metres of water. Fishing for wild brown trout is from the bank only.

A minor road continues north from the B954 at Dykend across the dam and up the east side to Glenhead farm. At the West end of the dam is a large car park with toilets. There is another car park and picnic area, with summer only toilets, on the east side. 

Leisurely Walk: walks for reasonably fit people with a little country walking experience. May include unsurfaced rural paths. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are recommended.

A level path goes around the edge of Clatto reservoir and smaller paths extend into Baldragon Woods and Clatto Moor (which has been planted with trees). Admiral Duncan wood has had trees planted to connect Clatto plantations to Templeton Woods to give wildlife such as red squirrels more habitat.

The water is home to many ducks and diving birds, with many fish living in the very deep water. Facilities at Clatto include a watersports centre, children's play areas, picnic and barbecue site.  The park offers recreational activities, such as watersports, that can be organised through Ancrum Outdoor Centre.

Easy Walk: walks for anyone who does not have a mobility difficulty, a specific health problem or is seriously unfit. Comfortable shoes or trainers can be worn.

Balgavies Loch has long been recognised by naturalists as an important site for wildlife. This inland loch is surrounded by reedbeds and willow carr, attracting water rail, great crested grebe and a number of wintering wildfowl, including goldeneye, teal and widgeon. The reserve is a haven for red squirrel.

Join the loop at the entrance to Balgay Park, off Glamis Road. An off road path starts next to the Yew bushes at the gateway.  The path follows the wall at the edge of Lochee Park. At the top, cross the road, passed the bollards to continue climbing. Turn right and keep to the right to go behind the observatory, following the track around the top of the hill. Turn right again at the gate to descend, keeping to the right at the bottom. Take the right turn at the old bandstand, going under the bridge to the starting point. Take a detour to the top of the Planet Trail for a great view. Balgay is easy to access from the Greenways cycle routes.

Start on City Road opposite Saggar Street.  Walk down City Road until you reach Scott Street.  Turn right onto Scott Street and then take the next left onto Glenagnes Road.  Turn right onto Logie Avenue and walk to the end of the street.  In front of your a path winds up to a viewpointt.  Take this path up to Balgay Road.  Cross over Balgay Road and turn right.  Take the path opposite and on your left into the park.  Follow this up to where several paths intersect and take the right hand path.  Follow this path keeping left, follow this round to the observatory.

After looking at the observatory, turn to your left towards the bollards.  Walk back down the road and turn to your left.  Take the eighth path on your right just after another set of bollards and follow it back down the hill.  At the bottom, turn right and walk back to another entrance to Balgay Park (beside Lochee Park).  Turn right and follow the path round the other side of the viewpoint.

When you reach the junction of paths (where you originally turned off for the observatory) turn left and continue on the trodden earth path back down to Saggar Street.  Walk back along Saggar Street to City Road.

Distance:  2 miles
Time:  1 hour
Grade:  2

Start on city Road opposite Saggar Street.  Walk down City Road until you reach Scott Street.  turn right onto Scott Street and then take the next left onto glenagnes Road.  Turn right onto Logie Avenue and walk to the end of the street.  In front of your a path winds up to a viewpoint.  Take this path up to Balgay Road.  Cross over Balgay Road and turn right.  Take the path on the left into the park.  Walk up to the second path on your right.  Take this path up the hill.  After the steps going down to your right, you will see a second set of steps going up to the right, beside a lamppost.  Take these steps and you will have an excellent view out across Dundee.  Continue on the trodden earth path back down to Saggar Street.  Walk back along Saggar Street to City Road.

Distance:  1.1 miles
Time:  25 minutes
Grade:  2

Balgay Hill, home of the city's Mills Observatory, has a fine mixture of deciduous and large conifer trees. For a relaxing afternoon, walk along the network of footpaths offering magnificent views across the River Tay.

Victoria Park offers a mixture of rose gardens, bedding plant displays, active play and recreational areas.

Lochee Park, donated to the city by the Cox Brothers (jute mill owners) in 1890, provides ample space for active sports.

A disabled access guide is available for this park which can be viewed on the AccessAble website.

Leisurely Walk: walks for reasonably fit people with a little country walking experience. May include unsurfaced rural paths. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are recommended.

Take time out from the city to enjoy some peace and quiet at Balkello Community Woodland. Just a short trip from Dundee, it's a great place to stretch your legs and enjoy sweeping views of the countryside, the city and the coast. There's an open grassy area, overlooking small ponds and a spring – ideal for a picnic. If you fancy a longer outing, Balkello is a gateway to the open Sidlaw Hills and on to Glamis.

Balkello's trees were only planted in the 1990s, but already the young woodland is a real contrast to the open fields around it. Birds sing among the trees and light plays through the branches: come back often and see how the forest grows.

Leisurely Walk: walks for reasonably fit people with a little country walking experience. May include unsurfaced rural paths. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are recommended.

Balmashanner Hill - locally known as Bummie - rises from the southern edges of Forfar and from its memorial there are fine views over the town. This short walk climbs up through Reid Park to make an enjoyable round.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

The pavilion and park were gifted to the people of Dundee by prominent flax mill owners, the Baxter family in 1863. The park was laid out by one of the great innovators and achievers of the 19th century, Sir Joseph Paxton and the pavilion was designed by his son in law, George Henry Stokes.

The historic glass fronted Italianate Pavilion positively shines in its restoration and brings classical grandeur to the park. It is situated in the midst of 38 acres of mature parkland and is reached through grand entrance gates and sweeping lawns.

A disabled access guide is available for this park which can be viewed on the Disabledgo website.

The valley in which the Birks lies was shaped during the ice age, with the river Tay running through its centre. It contains one of the tributaries of the Tay – the Moness Burn – and the site has been a scenic walk for more than two centuries.

The Birks owes its popularity, at least in part, to Robert Burns, who is said to have found inspiration whilst resting in a small, naturally formed seat in the rock at the side of the gorge.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

A low craggy peak to the south of Dunkeld, Birnam Hill was made famous by William Shakespeare's Scottish play, Macbeth. More recently, the area attracted the author Beatrix Potter, who spent many holidays here and is said to have drawn the inspiration for some of her famous characters from the Perthshire countryside.

Varied walk starting from the town centre, passing through woodland to view Black Spout waterfall and Edradour Distillery. From the higher section of the walk good views over the River Tummel and surrounding hills can be seen.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

Enjoy a 2.5 mile/4km circular walking trail on the outskirts of Markinch. Most of the trail is outwith the village and free from traffic noise. It’s very peaceful and contains some beautiful views of the Lomond Hills to the northwest and stunning views across the Forth to the south. The area is rich in plant and wildlife. You may even see buzzards and deer.

In late autumn, Buchanty Spout is filled with wild salmon as they fight there way up stream through the raging torrents. Please be advised that there is no formal path or viewing area, so please take care particularly when it is wet underfoot.

 

 

Donated by Sir James Caird, one of Dundee's local benefactors, the park includes Mains Castle and Den o' Mains. Mains Castle was renovated in the 1980's through a government scheme for the unemployed. The park is ideal for active recreation and walking with 18 and 9 hole golf courses, velodrome, athletic track and winter sports pitches. The Gelly Burn cuts through the park and feeds the ponds in Den o Mains. The wooded Den provides habitat for red squirrels, orchids and kingfishers. Other paths take visitors to see old oak avenues and grand old copper beaches.

Situated just 3 miles from Dundee city centre, off Kingsway West (A90), Camperdown Country Park is the largest public park in Dundee.  With the stunning neo-classical Camperdown House as its centre-piece, the park covers an area of over 400 acres, and is home to no fewer than 190 species of trees. One of the most popular parks in Dundee, among locals and visitors alike, Camperdown is open all year round and offers a fantastic range of activities and events.

A disabled access guide is available for this park which can be viewed on the AccessAble website.

From the car park, go down the South Drive from the entrance to the Wildlife Centre, and turn right at the bottom, following the blue waymarks.  This track follows the inside of the perimeter wall of Camperdown Park, climbing up to the derelict West Lodge. Cross the West Drive keeping to the left of the artificial turf of the golfers path.  The path joins the Green Circular for a while and climbs past the old Game Keepers cottage, and swings to the right for a long descent over the North Drive to the Main Drive.  Cross the Main Drive, keeping the wood to the left, for a quick descent around the edge of football pitches, to Laburnum Walk at the north of the play area. Keep the play area on your left to return to the car park.