Clatto Park has a large reservoir, woodland, paths and a play area. Ancrum Outdoor Centre use the reservoir for water sports. The water is home to many ducks and diving birds, with many fish living in the very deep water.  A level path goes around the edge of the reservoir and smaller paths extend into Baldragon Woods and Clatto Moor (which has been recently planted with trees). Admiral Duncan wood was also been be planted to connect Clatto plantations to Templeton Woods to give wildlife such as Red Squirrels more habitat.

The Clunie walk escapes from the centre of Pitlochry by climbing up into the forests above the opposite side of the River Tummell. There are good views across the town to the hills beyond.

Corrie Fee is truly dramatic, a massive bowl scooped out by a glacier, it is a National Nature Reserve. A very good path climbs gently to a viewpoint, with the option of extending the route to climb up the back of the corrie to a waterfall.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

Perched above Pitlochry, the summit of Craigower is perfectly placed to offer excellent views over some of the most spectacular countryside in Perthshire. The climb to the top through fertile upland fields and sheltered woodland - is strenuous in parts but once there you can savour vistas extending as far as Glencoe.

Craigvinean was one of the first of the 'Big Tree Country' forests, and one of several planted by the Dukes of Atholl. It became a popular place in Victorian times: early visitors delighted in the forest paths leading to follies and dramatic viewpoints. Now you can follow the trails to discover the same stunning views over Dunkeld and the mighty River Tay.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

Take a walking trail, enjoy scenic views, and look out for wildlife at Crombie Country Park, to the west of Arbroath in Angus.  Crombie Country Park consists of 200 acres of woodland around the striking Crombie Loch. Enjoy 7 km of woodland trails, including the Discovery Trail where you can find out about Crombie’s fascinating socialand natural history.

Dawson Park is the result of a bequest in 1940, by Mr William Dawson of Broughty Ferry "for the purpose of providing playing fields, sports grounds or other recreational facilities."  The park has feature plantings, a sunken garden, and a formal cherry avenue along the north axis, which is particularly stunning in spring.

A disabled access guide is available for this park which can be viewed on the AccessAble website.

The River Lednock cascades out from a rocky gorge in the atmospheric tree-clad amphitheatre known as the Deil's Cauldron. This excellent circular walk from the attractive village of Comrie visits the Cauldron as well as having an optional ascent to the Melville Monument, an obelisk on Dun More hill that is a fine viewpoint.

In the Scots dialect, ‘den’ means ‘wooded glen’, and this is a pleasant walk amongst mixed open woodland in the deep, shady glen of the Alyth Burn. This is a great place to rest and watch the varied wildlife. The oak, ash and birch trees are home to small birds such as treecreepers and great tits, whilst white dippers and grey wagtails live along the water.

Easy Walk: walks for anyone who does not have a mobility difficulty, a specific health problem or is seriously unfit. Comfortable shoes or trainers can be worn.

Deuchny’s bike park has features that make it ideal for sessioning. The rest of the forest has some great tracks to explore for cross-country rides and links to the wider countryside. And of course, Deuchny Hill is a wonderful place to explore on foot too.

Strenuous Walk: walks for experienced country walkers with an above average fitness level. May include hills and rough country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

The Castle is now used as office accommodation by Dundee City Council and is unfortunately not available for civil ceremonies. The gardens and surrounding parkland are all approved for civil weddings however and the castle provides a unique and historic backdrop for your photographs. The landscaping is largely limited to the steep slopes of the park, allowing the grass areas to be used for active and passive recreation.

A disabled access guide is available for this park which can be viewed on the AccessAble website.

There are three routes to choose from: the Bronze Route is a short walk along the drive, briefly through the woods and back to the hotel, the Silver Route is a walk through natural wood and the forest garden/wildlife area.

Easy Walk: walks for anyone who does not have a mobility difficulty, a specific health problem or is seriously unfit. Comfortable shoes or trainers can be worn.

The design of Duntrune Community Garden is based around a domestic home situation, with the central pergola structure as the house. Areas such as the front, back & kitchen gardens are all represented, giving the visitor ideas for design, plant combination and content that can be used in their own gardens. Additional features of interest include the Therapeutic Garden, gravel bed with water feature, heather garden and herbaceous borders.

Early in the eighteenth century a regular agricultural market fair was organised, but removed from the regular location of the Market-gait to Stobsmuir, the name of "Stobs Fair" being given to it. This fair continued to be held there till about 1830, when a murder committed during the turbulence of this carnival led to the removal of the site of the Fair to the ground in Strathmartine Road, which came to be known as "Fairmuir."

A disabled access guide is available for this park which can be viewed on the AccessAble website.

Follow the defined track up to a small man-made cavern and viewing platform with rugged views north to Drummond Hill above Kenmore and the majestic Ben Lawers range. In summer, the surrounding woodlands are alive with flocks of siskins and other bird and wildlife.

Moderate Walk: walks for people with country walking experience and a good level of fitness. May include some steep paths and open country. Walking boots and warm, waterproof clothing are essential.

The owners of Faskally House created this 'model woodland' in the 19th century and the house later became a school for young foresters. You can explore the rich mix of tree species along the Foresters' Trail, or take the easy access Dunmore Trail around the loch. Water lilies bloom here in summer, and there's spectacular show of autumn colour.  Watch out for wildlife here too. There are kingfishers and herons, and goldeneye ducks that nest in the trees.

Easy Walk: walks for anyone who does not have a mobility difficulty, a specific health problem or is seriously unfit. Comfortable shoes or trainers can be worn.

Finlathen and Drumgeith Parks have football pitches, woodland and paths, they are linked by the Green Circular cycle route. Finlathen Park has a play area and mini skate park. Drumgeith pavilion has changing facilities.

Forfar Loch Country Park situated on the west side of Forfar. With woodland, grassland and wetland habitats the park is a haven for wildlife and visitors throughout the year.

One of the six Angus glens, Glen Clova is a valley with superb views and an abundance of flora and wildlife.  It stretches northwest from Dykehead on the B955, following the River South Esk towards Glen Doll.

Glen Damff is a relatively small glen that nestles quietly, and quite unknown, among the Braes of Angus. Lying to the north of the Backwater Reservoir (maintained by Scottish Water) between Glen Prosen to the east and Glen Isla to the west, its stream joins that of Glen Taitney before entering the north end of the reservoir.  This route starts in the cul-de-sac of the unclassified road that follows the east side of the reservoir northwards to Glenhead Farm.

The Angus Glens are part of Cairngorms National Park and offer a range of trails to explore and wildlife to discover.  There's something for everyone to enjoy at Glen Doll. Why not take a walk along one of the six marked trails that lead from the car park? On the Corrie Fee Trail you'll even find signal posts that tell you what to look for.

 

In the upper valley there are numerous corries and waterfalls that give the glen a wildness.  Glen Esk still has a rich local history with Queens, castles, and cattle rustlers all part of the story.

Glen Esk is the longest and most easterly of the Angus Glens and, like the others, is sparsely populated. To reach the Glen take the 15 mile road, just north of Edzell that climbs alongside the River North Esk. A great reward for those who make the trip along the scenic winding road is is the excellent Glenesk Folk Museum where visitors can explore handicrafts and artifacts from bygone times.

A series of mountain walks reveals remote lochs and ancient pinewood remnants in the wild upper reaches. For those looking for something less strenuous, there is also plenty of scope for low level walking.

Although the Angus hills and glens of Clova and Prosen are possibly the best known and frequented, many walkers know little of the area around Glen Uig and Glen Quharity, to the south of Glen Prosen. Surrounding these two glens is a vast expanse of easy, broad, ridge walking on a scale that can be quite amazing when given the opportunity to look back and assess one's progress.